Physical Security Military Sign Requirements

Throughout the United States, Military installations have specific rules and guidelines for posting signs for physical security.

We took a detailed look at the rules and regulations, and outlined the specific requirements that pertain to signage on military installations below.

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Use these links to jump to the information you are interested in: Note: This is an archive document, and may not represent current military policy and procedures. Information contained in this article should not be used for compliance purposes.

Army Regulation 190-11:
“Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives”

Chapter 3: Physical Security Planning
Chapter 4: Protection of Arms
Chapter 5: Protection of Nonnuclear Missiles, Rockets, Ammunition, and Explosives

 

ATTP 3-39.32 (FM 3-19.30) Physical Security (August 2010)

Chapter 3: Site Design Approach
Chapter 4: Protective Barriers

Army Regulation 190-11:
“Physical Security of Arms, Ammunition, and Explosives”


Chapter 3: Physical Security Planning

3–6. Intrusion Detection System

f. Signs.

(1) Signs will be prominently displayed announcing the presence of IDS.

(2) All IDS signs will be affixed at general eye–level (when possible) on the exterior of each interior wall of the protected area that contains an entrance.

(3) All IDS signs will be affixed on exterior walls of the building only if the exterior wall contains an entrance to the protected area.

(4) Specifications for IDS signs are per appendix F. 

Chapter 4: Protection of Arms

4–5. Privately–owned weapons and ammunition

b. The carrying of privately–owned weapons, explosives, or ammunition on military installations are prohibited unless authorized by the installation commander or his designated representative.

Signs will be posted at installation access control points depicting this prohibition.

4–15. Restricted area designation

a. Commanders of military installations and facilities have the authority to publish and enforce regulations for safeguarding personnel, facilities, and property. This authority is derived from Title 50 United States Code Section 797 (50 USC 797) (Internal Security Act of 1950), implemented by DODI 5200.08 and DOD 5200.8–R.

b. Except when such action would tend to advertise an otherwise concealed area or when in conflict with host nation agreements, signs or notices will be posted in conspicuous and appropriate places to identify the AA&E facility a restricted area.

This includes signs posted at each entrance or approach to the area and on perimeter fences or boundaries of the area.

c. Post signs or notices in conspicuous and appropriate places to identify a restricted area (except when such action would tend to advertise an otherwise concealed area, or when in conflict with host nation agreements).

d. Post signs so as not to provide concealment of an intruder or obstruct visual assessment.

e. Post conspicuous signs and notices to give people approaching a restricted area actual knowledge of the restriction. Failure to do so may seriously hamper any resulting criminal prosecution. Each sign or notice will be marked with the words “RESTRICTED AREA,” and include the following warning notice:

THIS ACTIVITY HAS BEEN DECLARED A RESTRICTED AREA BY AUTHORITY OF THE OF THE INSTALLATION COMMANDER IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THE DIRECTIVE ISSUED BY THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ON 10 December 2005, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 21, INTERNAL SECURITY ACT OF 1950. UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY IS PROHIBITED. ALL PERSONS AND VEHICLES ENTERING HEREIN ARE LIABLE TO SEARCH. PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE FACILITIES IS PROHIBITED WITHOUT SPECIFIC AUTHORIZATION FROM THE COMMANDER. DEADLY FORCE IS AUTHORIZED.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:

Click here to request a quote on Restricted Area Warning Signs

f. Post warning signs that contain the local languages besides English in areas in which English is not the only common language.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:
 
Click here to request a quote on Restricted Area Warning Signs
Stonehouse can create a sign for any local language you require. 

We can create a sign with your provided translation, or can produce a translation in almost any language. 

g. Continue to post existing signs containing essentially the same wording as above until replacement is necessary at which time the required wording above will be used.

4–16. Intrusion Detection System signs

Arms storage facilities having IDS will have signs prominently displayed announcing the presence of IDS (see app F). Such signs will be affixed at eye level, when possible, on the exterior of each interior wall that contains an entrance to the arms storage room, vault, or building. Signs will be affixed on exterior walls only when the exterior walls contain an entrance to the arms storage facility.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:
 

Facility_Protected_By_Alarm_System_Military.jpg

Click here to request a quote on Intrustion Detection System Signs

Chapter 5: Protection of Nonnuclear Missiles, Rockets, Ammunition, and Explosives

5–10. Restricted area designation

a. Commanders of military installations and facilities have the authority to publish and enforce regulations for safeguarding personnel, facilities, and property. This authority is derived from 50 USC 797, implemented by DODI 5200.8, and DOD 5200.8–R.

b. Except when such action would tend to advertise an otherwise concealed area, or when in conflict with host nation agreements, signs or notices will be posted in conspicuous and appropriate places to identify the AA&E facility a restricted area. This includes signs posted at each entrance or approach to the area and on perimeter fences or boundaries of the area.

c. Position signs so as not to provide concealment of an intruder or obstruct visual assessment.

d. Failure to post conspicuous signs and notices to give people approaching a restricted area actual knowledge of the restriction, may seriously hamper any resulting criminal prosecution. Each sign or notice will be marked with the words “RESTRICTED AREA,” and include the following warning notice:

THIS ACTIVITY HAS BEEN DECLARED A RESTRICTED AREA BY AUTHORITY OF THE INSTALLATION COMMANDER IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF THE DIRECTIVE ISSUED BY THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE ON 10 December 2005, PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 21, INTERNAL SECURITY ACT OF 1950. UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY IS PROHIBITED. ALL PERSONS AND VEHICLES ENTERING HEREIN ARE LIABLE TO SEARCH. PHOTOGRAPHY OF THE FACILITIES IS PROHIBITED WITHOUT SPECIFIC AUTHORIZATION FROM THE COMMANDER. DEADLY FORCE IS AUTHORIZED.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:
 
Click here to request a quote on Restricted Area Warning Signs

e. In areas in which English is not the only common language, warning signs will contain the local languages besides English.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:
 
Click here to request a quote on Restricted Area Warning Signs
Stonehouse can create a sign for any local language you require. 

We can create a sign with your provided translation, or can produce a translation in almost any language. 

f. Existing signs containing essentially the same wording as above may continue to be used until replacement is necessary, at which time the required wording above will be used.

5–11. Intrusion Detection System signs

Signs clearly announcing the presence of an IDS will be displayed on ammunition storage rooms, magazines, or perimeter barriers using such a system. Signs will be affixed at eye level, when possible. They will be affixed on the exterior walls containing an entrance to the ammunition or explosives storage room, vault, building, or magazine or, in the case of alarmed barrier fences, on the outside of the fence at about 100–meter intervals.

Signs will be placed at a location where they will not hinder observation or fields of fire. Signs will not be placed where they may be used by intruders to gain entry. Alarm signs will not create nuisance alarms. Otherwise, the signs will be posted outside the perimeter fence. The IDS signs meeting the specifications of appendix F will be used.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:
 

Facility_Protected_By_Alarm_System_Military.jpg

Click here to request a quote on Intrustion Detection System Signs

 

ATTP 3-39.32 (FM 3-19.30) Physical Security
August 2010- Headquarters, Department of the Army

 

Chapter 3: Site Design Approach

3-27. Active perimeter entrances should be designated so that security forces maintain full control without an unnecessary delay in traffic. This is accomplished by having sufficient entrances to accommodate the peak flow of pedestrian and vehicular traffic and by having adequate lighting for rapid and efficient inspections.

When ACPs are not operational, they should be securely locked, illuminated during hours of darkness, and periodically inspected by a roving patrol. Additionally, warning signs should be used to alert drivers when gates are closed. Doors and windows on buildings that form a part of the perimeter should be locked, lighted, and inspected.

WARNING SIGNS

3-31. Signs should be erected to assist in controlling authorized entry, deter unauthorized entry, and preclude accidental entry. Signs should be plainly displayed and be legible from any approach to the perimeter from a reasonable distance. The size and coloring of a sign, its letters, and the interval of posting must be appropriate to each situation.

3-32. Warning signs augment control signs. They warn intruders that the area is restricted and that trespassing may result in the use of deadly force. The signs should be posted at intervals of no more than 100 feet.

3-33. Warning signs should be installed along the physical barriers of the controlled area and at each entry point where they can be seen readily and understood by anyone approaching the perimeter. In areas where English is one of two or more languages commonly spoken, warning signs must contain the local language in addition to English.

The wording on the signs will denote warning of a restricted area. Additionally, the warning signs prescribed in AR 190-13 should be posted at all entrances to restricted areas within the boundaries of the base.

Stonehouse Signs recommends the following signs to adhere to this regulation:

Click here to request a quote on Restricted Area Warning Signs

Chapter 4: Protective Barriers

4-20. An active vehicle barrier is capable of inflicting serious injury when activated inadvertently. Warning signs, lights, bells, and bright colors should be used to mark the presence of a barrier and make it visible to oncoming traffic. Pedestrian traffic should be channeled away from the barrier.

For high-volume traffic flow, vehicle barriers are normally open, allowing vehicles to pass, and activated when a threat has been detected. Security forces should be able to activate and close the barrier before the threat vehicle can reach it. Where threat conditions are high, barriers are normally closed and opened only after authorization has been verified.

For additional information regarding the location and operation of vehicle barriers, see UFC 4-022-01.

4-46. Use of multiple barrier materials and construction techniques can sometimes accomplish one-barrier purpose with less expensive and less disruptive construction techniques.

For example, use of ballistic-resistant, glass-clad polycarbonate panels accompanied by overt surveillance cameras, warning signs, and annunciator devices (such as flashing lights and buzzers) can create an intimidating picture of a high-security barrier adjacent to a high-security passageway. The cost is equal to, or less than, the construction of a reinforced masonry wall to accomplish the same purpose.

Consideration should be taken when employing methods that tie in with, or incorporate into, an existing security system. When two security systems are not properly matched or integrated, the overall cost to later modify them for compatibility can be enormous.

Source: Official U.S. Army Field Manual ATTP 3-39.32 (FM 3-19.30), August 2010 revision

Note: This is an archive document. Updates to ATTP 3-39.32 may have occurred since publication.

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